NEWS RELEASE

Monday, April 10, 2017

 

The Board of Defiance County Commissioners met in regular session at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, April 10, 2017 in the Second Floor Conference Room of the Commissioners’ Session Room at 500 Court Street, Defiance, Ohio 43512. Commissioner Ryan Mack called the meeting to order.  Also present were Commissioners Gary Plotts and Mick Pocratsky, Sherry Carnahan, Finance Manager/Administrator, and Stephanie Metz, Clerk.

 

The Commissioners met in General Session and approved and signed various resolutions, contracts and documents. The Commissioners also reviewed the calendar of events and discussed upcoming meetings.

 

Ohio Revised Code §6137.11 and §6137.112 provide for a permanent base review of improvements for maintenance fund assessments after six annual maintenance fund assessments have been made. Ohio Revised Code §6137.11 provides for the mechanism to add to the schedule of benefited landowners any other owner who in the judgment of the board is benefited by the operation and maintenance of the improvement as the result of new conditions that have arisen since the improvement was constructed. On March 7, 2017, benefitted landowners of the following ditches were provided notice of the Public Hearing in accordance with the Ohio Revised Code: Hancock Ditch, Lehman Ditch, Miller Ditch and Huston Moats Ditch. Public Hearings for all of these were held on Tuesday, April 4, 2017. Today in session the Board reviewed and approved the following:

·       The Hancock Ditch is 2,143 feet long and was petitioned in 1974 with a total construction base of $1,645.40. The average annual cost to maintain this improvement over the last six years has been $488.74. The new proposed construction cost, which was figured at the current construction costs, is $4,337.40. It was discovered that two parcels of land should be on the schedule of benefited landowners. The parcels are described as: K14-8000-0-004-00, which is owned by Tiffin Township Trustees, and K14-8000-0-003-00, which is owned by Defiance County Engineer. The new construction cost and benefited landowners were approved.

·       The Lehman Ditch is 9,400 feet long and was petitioned in 1963 with a total construction base of $3,910.60. The average annual cost to maintain this improvement over the last six years has been $1,530.77. The new proposed construction cost, which was figured at the current construction costs, is $21,020.00. The new construction cost was approved.

·       The Miller Ditch is 2,800 feet long and was petitioned in 1968 with a total construction base of $1,892.60. The average annual cost to maintain this improvement over the last six years has been $471.31. The new proposed construction cost, which was figured at the current construction costs, is $6,680.00. It was discovered that four parcels of land should be on the schedule of benefited landowners. The parcels are described as: C17-0018-0-002-00, which is owned by ODOT; C17-0018-0-015-00, which is owned by Richard & Betty Lou Baker; C17-0018-0-013-01, which is owned by Richard & Betty Lou Baker; and C17-0018-0-012-01, which is owned by Richard & Betty Lou Baker. The new construction cost and benefited landowners were approved.

·       The Huston Moats Ditch is 11,632 feet long and was petitioned in 1962 with a total construction base of $7,680.02. The average annual cost to maintain this improvement over the last six years has been $3,278.36. The new proposed construction cost, which was figured at the current construction costs, is $26,137.60. The new construction cost was approved.

 

Bruce Clevenger and Teresa Johnson, Defiance County OSU Extension, met with the Commissioners to provide a quarterly update. They provided the following updates:

Agriculture Natural Resources:

·       252 area farmers recertified their private pesticide applicators license. On average, each participant applies pesticides on 733 acres, making this year’s program reach 52,775 acres of cropland.

·       An Ohio Law passed in 2014 now requires farmers and commercial applicators of fertilizer to be certified by September 2017. OSU Extension is the exclusive provider of the Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training (FACT). Certification is required if commercial fertilizer is applied on 50 acres or more of cropland. Ohio farmers and ag dealers that have a pesticide applicator license will attend a 2 hour training to obtain fertilizer certification while farmers without a pesticide applicator license will attend a 3 hour training to obtain fertilizer certification. Clevenger taught eight area FACT meetings reaching 344 fertilizer applicators with information about water quality, proper soil sampling, calculating fertilizer recommendations, and utilizing plant nutrients where needed and not needed. Farmers are managing nutrients to reduce production costs, produce responsible crop yields, and have a positive impact on water quality.

·       During January, February and March, over 125 phone calls, email and/or personal visits were made to the county agriculture/natural resources educator and staff. Examples of requested information: farmland rent and value, fertilizer certification, pesticide license recertification, direct marketing of farm products, crop and soil management, and farm financial management.

·       111 area farm managers participated in meetings on the value of keeping farm records. Participants learned how record keeping can measure profit and loss, describe the farm's financial position, evaluate the need for new investments or obtaining commercial loans, evaluating farm enterprises and tracking personal spending. Records are more than just financial; they also involve production, labor, land management and maintenance.

·       The 2017 class of OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (MGV) began in March and will finish in late April. 13 Master Gardener Interns participate in 50 hours of horticultural training and will complete 50 hours of community volunteering to become a Certified MGV. Course topics include: Botany, Soils, Plant Diseases, Propagation, Insects, Herbs, Vegetables, Pollinators, Rain Gardens & Native Plants, Ornamental Plants, Integrated Pest Management, Lawns, Small Fruit, Fruit Trees, Tree Care, Backyard Wildlife, Invasive Species, and Horticultural Diagnostics. A MGV is trained to assist OSU Extension with consumer horticulture questions, educational efforts and community improvement projects. To remain active and certified, an MGV will then annually participate in 10 hours of advanced training and 20 hours of community volunteering. Defiance County currently has 24 active/certified MGVs that gave over 2,400 hours of volunteer hours in 2016.

SNAP Ed:

·       The SNAP Ed Program presented 81 educational sessions with over 1,700 people participating.

·       The adult classes of Ohio Means Jobs and Island Manor focused on MyPlate by learning to eat different colors of fruits and vegetables to get the most nutrition from the various colors. Participants were encouraged to choose low fat dairy products. They were surprised to see how much fat is in an 8oz. glass of whole milk. Many comments were made that they were going to switch to 2% or 1%.

·       Preschoolers at Defiance and Hicksville Head Start have finished learning about the 5 food groups on MyPlate and enjoyed making a MyPlate bracelet. Second graders at Defiance Elementary always enjoy seeing fake germs on their hands and learning about the importance of hand washing.

·       Defiance Middle School 8th graders finished up their nutrition classes by making a healthy snack. Fruit yogurt parfaits were enjoyed by everyone. They learned that healthy snacks can be easy to make and taste good.

·       Cooking Matters started again in Defiance County. The class graduated 9 participants and was held at St. Paul's United Methodist Church. MyPlate, grains, sugary drinks, grocery shopping are just a few topics covered. Chicken burgers, turkey taco, vegetable lasagna and frittata were some of the meals that were prepared.

4H Youth Development:

·       The 4-H Educator conducted Real Colors® training for the Bryan Area Business Women group. 20 adults, both professional and retired, took part in the hands on workshop. Real Colors® is a dynamic workshop experience using a personality type test. Participants gain an understanding of the four colon (each corresponding to a personality type) and discover where they fall as an individual on the Real Colors spectrum.

·       105 youth from Defiance Middle School and Tinora High School participated Real Money, Real World, an active hands-on experience that gives young people the opportunity to make lifestyle and budget choices similar as those of an adult. The curriculum builds awareness of the connection between education, occupation, income and financial choices. This program utilizes 15 business and professional volunteers from the community in providing the real life simulation experience.

·       The 4-H Educator conducted training for those adult and teen volunteers who have care, custody, or control of minors during an activity or program with minors. 55 Defiance County 4-H Volunteers and 145 4-H Camp counselors from the region received training.

·       4-H Officer training was conducted by the Defiance County 4-H Advisory Council. Sixty-eight 4-Hers received training for the following positions: President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Health/Safety.

·       Annual 4-H Mall Show was conducted in March at the Defiance County Northtowne Mall. There were 68 youth and 15 adults representing twelve 4-H Clubs volunteered and conducted activities.

 

Kirk Mizerak and Amy Hoffman, Palmer Energy, and Keith Blosser, CCAO, met with the Commissioners to review the final numbers for the electric aggregation program Dynegy was awarded the three year contract.

 

Release Approved:            ____________________________________________________           

                                                Ryan Mack, Defiance County Commissioner